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Monday, September 15th, 2014 09:09 Comments Off

The Man on Her Mind

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Reviews:
Peter Keough(Boston Globe): Perhaps the filmmakers intended to aggravate the solipsistic nature of the circumstances, but the effect is the mark of simple incompetence.
Tirdad Derakhshani(Philadelphia Inquirer): The Man forward Her Mind, a mirthless, stagy fantastic comedy about a pair of New York loners, isn't such much a story as a worn out concept – a one-liner, really. An aged, used-up one at that.
Andy Webster(New York Times): Ping-Ponging dialogue and arch pop-lite refrains filter to delineate portraits of insular, enunciate. and bourgeois neurosis.
Tom Keogh(Seattle Times): How conclude we know when we're truly living authentic lives, or have entirely given ourselves over to passion and confidence with another? It wouldn't occur to greatest number romantic comedies to ask those questions. "The Man On Her Mind" answers them.
David Lewis(San Francisco Chronicle): The Man ~ward Her Mind, a belabored, un-quaint romantic comedy, is a case study of what can go wrong when adapting a drama play into a movie.
Sam Weisberg(Village Voice): The Man in successi~ Her Mind has a terminal capsule of the cutes.
David Noh(Film Journal International): Cutesiness carried to nauseating extremities.
Nick Prigge(Slant Magazine): The pellicle suggests an ineffectual mishmash of Ruby Sparks-ish vainglorious concept and modern Elizabethan comedy.

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Monday, September 15th, 2014 09:09 Comments Off

Bird People

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Reviews:
A.O. Scott(New York Times): Viewed from a actual angle, "Bird People" is a self-same sad movie. But it's likewise a lark.
Jordan Hoffman(New York Daily News): The most of all moments in "Bird People" rise to such heights that you for the most part want to forgive the parts that sum to mere droppings.
Mike D’Angelo(AV Club): A pellicle that finds beauty and drama in the tiniest places.
Melissa Anderson(Village Voice): Bird People finds strange ways to anatomize 21st-century malaise.
Peter Debruge(Variety): It's deliciously risky, allowing Ferran falls far short of Icarus' nonsense, soaring low and returning to nature having risked too little.
Jordan Mintzer(Hollywood Reporter): Two puzzled souls flock together, sort of, in one ambitious French film that takes flying in some highly unusual ways.
Daniel Carlson(Movie Mezzanine): Bird People is superficial but never inconsequential, dreamy but never unbelievable.
Brian Tallerico(RogerEbert.com): Ferran is running downward to "flights of fancy," absolution the pun, as some scenes in his film go on unchecked while others aren't allowed closely the right amount of time to unravel.
Noel Murray(The Dissolve): This is a wisp of a movie, and now it deals with an experience in this way pervasive that it's usually meanly acknowledged-this restlessness people feel to float off to somewhere else.
Doris Toumarkine(Film Journal International): Fanciful, creative and unexpected airport-set drama that captures the frenzy and pressures of modern life contrasted with lives led by creatures free while a bird. But quirkiness and duration may delay takeoff.
Jesse Cataldo(Slant Magazine): Pascale Ferran's film isn't daring enough to abundantly embrace the narrative fragmentation that it sporadically assumes.
Oliver Lyttelton(The Playlist): …we just found it too oblique, too delighted through itself, and frankly, too dull, to wonder at it much. It's apparently a good thing that it exists, except it's not for us.

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Monday, September 15th, 2014 09:09 Comments Off

Take Me to the River

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Reviews:
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): "Take Me to the River" is at its ut~ interesting when zeroing in on the back-and-abroad between musicians of different eras …
Andy Webster(New York Times): An often vibrant documentary about the making of every album of the same title, seeking to join generations.
Thomas Lee(San Francisco Chronicle): "Take Me to the River" falls woefully wanting on offering a serious contribution to the record of African American-inspired music.
Keith Uhlich(Time Out New York): You be able to't help but feel completely the palpable joy is eliding more darker realities that would lend the full musical performances a deeper resonance.
Serena Donadoni(Village Voice): The crabbed-generational collaborations begin to click then musicians who found fame in the 1950s, '60s, and '70s revoke the importance of mentors on their careers and establish an eagerness to pass on their accumulated judiciousness.
John Beifuss(Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)): Not in such a manner much a traditional documentary as a melodious celebration of Memphis' status to the degree that what host Terrence Howard calls the same of the 'special places forward this Earth'…
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): Pleasant enough, ~-end there have been far better melody docs on this subject and in this "Let's form a new record with some legends" format.
Chris Barsanti(Film Journal International): This kind, star-studded documentary about Memphis melody is more over-enthusiastic jam session than film.

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Monday, September 15th, 2014 08:09 Comments Off

Alumbrones

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Reviews:
Rachel Saltz(New York Times): Short and silvery and limited …
Simon Abrams(Village Voice): Alumbrones's creators utter up their work's corrective value, but never go into distinguished detail about the world beyond their canvases.
Marsha McCreadie(Film Journal International): Much of this is in the "who knew" fashion, and it's lovely to commit to memory extended shots of the art. But the human flare is not skirted either.
Prairie Miller(Critical Women): A vividly conceived rove into the creative imagination and warmth of feeling of artists in Cuba. And that which miracle happens when art purely to the degree that a socially subsidized and esteemed professional race, is liberated with a luminescent buoyant from money.

Monday, September 15th, 2014 08:09 Comments Off

Born To Fly

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Reviews:
Sara Stewart(New York Post): Director Catherine Gund ut~ successfully depicts the visceral impact of Streb's act …
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): A singularly focused and avant-garde endowment, Ms. Streb bends the messy driving on of risk to her indomitable be disposed.
Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): There's ~t any discounting the pleasure of catching Streb adhering the big screen.
Joe Leydon(Variety): This fascinating documentary depicts avant-garde choreographer Elizabeth Strep for the re~on that both visionary and ringmaster.
Daniel Walber(Nonfics): Born to Fly is a solid profile of choreographer Elizabeth Streb, however it misses the opportunity to else effectively capture the blunt physicality of her operate with the tools of cinema.

Monday, September 15th, 2014 08:09 Comments Off

The Zero Theorem

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Reviews:
Keith Staskiewicz(Entertainment Weekly): Gilliam's tendency for overstimulation can numb your optic cortex, but Theorem is still the most good thing he's pulled disclosed of that bag in a space of time.
Geoff Pevere(Globe and Mail): At one time cluttered and cavernous, hysterical and static, imaginative and cynical, The Zero Theorem works greatest in number effectively moment by moment and in the minutiae.
Peter Howell(Toronto Star): As usual with Gilliam's films, the lengthening is more delightful to behold than to parse.
Todd Gilchrist(TheWrap): replete of Gilliam's stylistic hallmarks – layered realities, repressing technology, institutional paranoia and of move swiftly, quirky romance – it feels like a physical journey into his beliefs, as it stares into the distribute between reason and faith.
Mary Corliss(TIME Magazine): The Zero Theorem is a sight that demands to be cherished – considered in the state of long as the society Gilliam portrays is a diatribe, not a prophesy.
Deborah Young(Hollywood Reporter): Something of a roller coaster and fairly bumpy, the ride is the point in dispute here.
Chuck Bowen(Slant Magazine): Terry Gilliam has imposed a join tape of his greatest hits, whose disinterestedness was debatable to begin with, on a whiff of a story that efficacy've flourished under the by-word "less is more."
Josh Larsen(LarsenOnFilm): …wonders whether or not we're headed toward a globe in which efficiency is valued atop of all else – at the expense of relationships, cleverness, even meaning.
Tasha Robinson(The Dissolve): Regardless of to what degree Gilliam may have finessed the substance, the finished film feels like a heavily edited Gilliam bestow-reel-not just like a manager working in a signature style, excepting like a crazy-quilt sewn in the same time from well-known fragments.
Josh Bell(Las Vegas Weekly): Gilliam have power to often do wonders with pseudo-philosophical moonshine, but this time his flair on this account that the ridiculous can't overbear the flat, ponderous story.
Chris Knight(National Post): Gilliam's latest, through a script by first-time screenwriter Pat Rushin, may in certainty be about an insane man in a differently insane being. This makes it a difficult falsehood to grasp, but a wild ride whether you can manage to hold without ceasing.
Jason Best(Movie Talk): Terry Gilliam created a surreal comic masterpiece with his 1985 film Brazil, only he fails to pull off the same feat with this similarly retro-futuristic dystopian information.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): Not some of Terry Gilliam's in a more excellent way films, but his misfires are stop nothing if not interesting. Waltz is excellent.
MaryAnn Johanson(Flick Filosopher): Terry Gilliam descends into at hand self-parody with this mess of a would-have ~ing philosophical mind-frak about a precise formula for the meaning of life that has petty to say.
Anthony Morris(The Vine): The fable he's [Terry Gilliam] effective is kind of muddled, drags put ~ a lot of the time, and has an ending that fails to pull it wholly together. It's definitely something worth considering, but still; this is a theorem that doesn't quite reckon up up.
Philippa Hawker(Sydney Morning Herald): Things betide, literally and philosophically, in [the pellicle], but without much real conviction; in that place's an odd kind of lifelessness to the film, despite the energetic paraphernalia and potentially profound stakes that Gilliam conjures up toward us to contemplate.
Blake Howard(2UE That Movie Show): The Zero Theorem is a Gilliam carnival riding the eddy into oblivion and it's weirdly enjoyable.
Margaret Pomeranz(At the Movies (Australia)): It's unusual and funny.
Tom Clift(Concrete Playground): As prominent and intriguing as it is cluttered and confused. In the end, it contains fair enough interesting elements to justify the require to be paid of a ticket.
Simon Miraudo(Quickflix): As narratively alienating considered in the state of Gilliam's most abstract efforts, and a fitting participant to recent someday-satires Cosmopolis and Holy Motors.
Craig Mathieson(Sydney Morning Herald): Gilliam is in the same manner busy shaping every visual element that his bearing lead has about as much extent as one of his clever props, like the melodious pizza box or Tilda Swinton's online recoil.
Louise Keller(Urban Cinefile): Explodes attached screen in a blaze of invention with its thought-provoking concepts, dogged humour and uniquely zany visuals… It may not evermore make sense, but one thing is according to sure – it's one assembly of demons of a ride
Matthew Pejkovic(Matt’s Movie Reviews): We are constantly kept at crest-length to watch another visually nauseating, gibberish riddled, Gilliam vagary-show.

Thursday, September 11th, 2014 18:09 Comments Off

Holy Ghost

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Monday, September 8th, 2014 07:09 Comments Off

Gringo Trails

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Reviews:
Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): This well-significance but superficial film skips across the orb, raising some provocative arguments but advancing small in number.
Diana Clarke(Village Voice): Vail's film earnestly interrogates authenticity even as her camera lingers up~ the body a beach without footprints, inviting the viewer to walk.
Eric Monder(Film Journal International): It isn't completed and could have been much tougher-minded – especially here and there the country's "selling" of tourism – if it be not that this film should start a that cannot be spared and overdue conversation.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): Pegi Vail beautifully edited pellicle somehow addresses a lot, but ultimately says little.

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Monday, September 8th, 2014 07:09 Comments Off

The Rule

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Reviews:
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): This uplifting documentary offers a unusual ray of hope in its likeness of an urban school that's defying the supremacy.
Stephen Whitty(Newark Star-Ledger): A moving film about an inspiring place …
Neil Genzlinger(New York Times): Though it has attractive elements, it doesn't certainly deliver on that promise, leaving it sympathetic more like a promotional video than like a exact documentary.
Daphne Howland(Village Voice): Benedict … believed that men should be connected to each other, that mercy, forgiveness, and understanding were as of great weight as those disciplines. The Rule illustrates exactly how far that can go.

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Monday, September 8th, 2014 07:09 Comments Off

Last Days in Vietnam

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Reviews:
David Edelstein(New York Magazine/Vulture): In acme, Last Days is the best humane of doc – it ties you up in knots.
Andrew O’Hehir(Salon.com): One of the things that makes Kennedy's film so powerful is that it's not blameless a story of stupidity and tragedy and incompetence, although there's else than enough of those qualities to have existence found in the history of America's Vietnamese reverse.
A.O. Scott(New York Times): Perhaps the principally striking thing about "Last Days in Vietnam," Rory Kennedy's eye-opening documentary about the 1975 evacuation of the American Embassy in Saigon, is to what extent calmly it surveys what was formerly among the angriest topics in American civic life.
Jake Coyle(Associated Press): "Last Days of Vietnam" is eerily omen for its implicit warnings to the fallout of politic abandonment. But it's moreover, on a more micro level, inspiring. Even in failed wars, lives can be saved.
Jordan Hoffman(New York Daily News): This circumstance-driven doc is eye-opening and at state of things thrilling. A sequence following a chopper guide trying to get his family to ~y American aircraft carrier is like a uncivil film unto itself.
Mike D’Angelo(AV Club): It's not a documentary that reinvents the fashion or will alter anyone's perceptivity of the war, but sometimes a laughable, exhaustive chronicle is more than sufficiency.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): Well-edited, exciting and thrilling. It would make a vast double feature with Hearts and Minds.
Keith Phipps(The Dissolve): By meander her attention to an underreported chapter in fresh history, Kennedy has found a trove humorous with unreal imagery and stories of endurance in the face of defeat.
Matt Prigge(Metro): That Henry Kissinger is in that place, uncontested as he pawns off the identical dodgy claims he has for four decades, is a enigma.
Zach Hollwedel(Under the Radar): It is stiff to believe the events director Rory Kennedy depicts in Last Days in Vietnam, at the very time with incredible archival footage and enlightening interviews.
Sean Burns(Movie Mezzanine): A riveting legend told in the most pedestrian and prosaic fashion possible.
Godfrey Cheshire(RogerEbert.com): As majestic documentaries do, "Last Days in Vietnam" humanizes events that have power to seem merely factual in news reports and textbooks.
Ron Wilkinson(Monsters and Critics): Emotion packed thriller of America's Southeast Asia Dunkirk.
Chris Barsanti(Film Racket): masterful and Oscar-exemplary…
Steve Macfarlane(Slant Magazine): For American viewers who dress in't know, the doc determination be a worthy footnote to a lingering bout of deliberate cultural amnesia, nevertheless it's too telling that the Vietnamese remain in the background.
Nora Lee Mandel(Film-Forward.com): First-bodily substance accounts put audience into gripping you-are-in that place Saigon, April 1975. . .When it sticks with those with no political investment, testimonies are entirely moving.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): A "you are in that place" documentary with all the irritation and heartbreaks of a fast-influencing narrative movie.

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Current time is: 21 Sep 2014 02:01