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Monday, April 21st, 2014 08:04 Comments Off

Half The Road: The Passion, Pitfalls & Power Of Women’s Professional Cycling

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Reviews:
Anita Gates(New York Times): The word is repeated ad infinitum; this documentary is sedulously long for a project of this description.
Diana Clarke(Village Voice): An enraging portrait of entrenched sexism in competitive sports that proves equivalence is worth fighting for.
Anna Storm(Film Journal International): A greater amount of balanced portrait, one that allows audiences to extend to on their own the conclusion Bertine draws in so bold strokes, may have resulted in a other subtle, sophisticated and effective argument.

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Monday, April 21st, 2014 08:04 Comments Off

Fray

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Reviews:
Gary Goldstein(Los Angeles Times): Kaplan comes over so convincingly, it's not truthless to wonder if he's with truth an actor (he is).
Michael Nordine(L.A. Weekly): The flaws sink away once you see the anticipate in Justin's eye being of the cl~s who the person interviewing him for a job at a dairy bar says the domestic arrangements turns into 'kind of a battlefield' during the summer.

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Monday, April 21st, 2014 08:04 Comments Off

Tasting Menu

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Reviews:
Daniel M. Gold(New York Times): Unfortunately, Roger Gual's moiety-baked film hopes to split the jarring between romantic comedy and foodie delectation but fails at both.
Sheri Linden(Los Angeles Times): Even through such fine actors as Fionnula Flanagan and Stephen Rea in the the whole, the Spanish-Irish co-production is a flavorless combat that has all the bite of a dining apartment-bound episode of "The Love Boat."
Farran Smith Nehme(New York Post): "Tasting Menu'' is pleasing without being striking and pleasing, but no more. A bon-bon, not a meal.
Nick Schager(Village Voice): A mushy concoction that's not and nothing else unfulfilling, it's gag-estimable.
Anna Tatarska(Movie Mezzanine): If this na the black art was available in pill form, I pledge it would become a bestseller. Farewell, Zoloft and Lexapro. Welcome, Chakulax.
Susan Wloszczyna(RogerEbert.com): Nothing in deed creates any emotional waves, and trivial seems at stake, no matter the kind of potential disaster might seem to exist in the offing.
Christine N. Ziemba(Paste Magazine): The need of true conflict, comedy or in like manner just a hint of spice in this diet-themed dramedy leaves viewers feeling unsatiated.
David Ehrlich(The Dissolve): The film is so busy attending to wholly its people that it never manages to adequately be of use to any of them[.]
Mike D’Angelo(AV Club): Among other demerits, this is the uncommon foodie movie that doesn't look to care much about food.
Clayton Dillard(Slant Magazine): There's a wicked, even insidious quality to a pellicle that insists upon using incessant forage montages not as a source of transport, but fodder for class-based self-gratulation.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): Foodies volition be disappointed as the shaking camera superficially gazes at the kitchen while emphasizing annoying characters.
Steve Newall(Flicks.co.nz): A urbane, if insubstantial, film-watching experience.

Monday, April 21st, 2014 08:04 Comments Off

Bad Country

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Reviews:
Justin Chang(Variety): A blandly executed play-thriller whose cast names (Matt Dillon, Willem Dafoe) and gentle '80s Louisiana flavor offer merely modest compensations for the story's skilful construction and routine twists.
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): [A] thoroughly round, straight-to-video-reminiscent action thriller fixed beforehand in Louisiana.

Monday, April 21st, 2014 07:04 Comments Off

Tenaliraman (Tenali Raman) (Thenali Raman)

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Monday, April 21st, 2014 07:04 Comments Off

Redwood Highway

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Reviews:
Bill Edelstein(Variety): Solid acting overcomes a lack of dynamic severe effort in this family-friendly film.

Sunday, April 20th, 2014 07:04 Comments Off

Here Comes the Devil

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Reviews:
Peter Howell(Toronto Star): An auteur like Carlos Reygadas would be in possession of taken this in a worthwhile oversight, and he did something like this by his significantly artier film Post Tenebras Lux.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): A fuddled supernatural thriller that fails to capitalize steady either its horrific prologue or eerie locating.
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): Fond of lurching weirdness, disagreeing inserts and sonic loudness, Bogliano shows he's invested for example much in conveying the psychodrama of a fractured home in the manner that he is the signposts of edgy, bloody retro-infused terror.
Jordan Hoffman(New York Daily News): Bogliano keeps the point of concentration on the psychology rather than the bloodlust, so "Here Comes The Devil" rises in the heavenly heights the schlock of typical horror.
Matt Patches(Time Out New York): Bogliano's unnerving vein, complemented by grungy camerawork and a screen of sonic chaos, provides an emotional descent that makes anything possible.
Rob Staeger(Village Voice): Horror movies punish the sexually irresponsible; the Spanish-speech film Here Comes the Devil manages to present a married couple with that slasher-movie charge.
Jay Stone(Canada.com): There's apparently a frightening movie in there in one place or another, or at least a darkly sly one, but this version can't resolve the chills of a half-glimpsed secret.
Steve Biodrowski(Cinefantastique): Fuses the grindhouse through the arthouse into an interesting ~-end unsatisfying hybrid.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-beam.com): Has mood but no substantive presence, making the movie a grip suddenly bag of lustful encounters and skin-ripping stab, while submitting the most vaginally-inspired figurative language of the film year.
John Wirt(Advocate (Baton Rouge, LA)): The idiosyncratic, notched-meets-subtle style writer-director AdriGarcBogliano demonstrates in this Mexican panic story suggests we'll have existence seeing more of his nightmares.
Jen Chaney(RogerEbert.com): "Here Comes the Devil" is a detestation movie. The problem is that scribe-director AdriGarcBogliano can't decide the sort of kind of horror movie he wants it to exist .
Noel Murray(The Dissolve): Bogliano provides a undeviating series of jolts, all the route to an ending that's twisty on the other hand ultimately unsatisfying.
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): Better sex scenes than scary scenes. Too hardly any of either to make a controversy.
Maitland McDonagh(Film Journal International): But one time it becomes clear that the children truly are possessed — cue the flickering lungs and late-night levitation — Here Comes the Devil settles into ~y all-too familiar groove.
Matt Donato(We Got This Covered): Here Comes The Devil embraces a infallible amount of midnight movie fun, if it be not that with a lack of true terror, you'll be screaming "WHAT?!" concerning all the wrong reasons.
Jesse Cataldo(Slant Magazine): The film is eventually revealed as less partial in subverting or playing off its influences than rigorously retracing them.
Simon Foster(Screen-Space): It exudes one effective creepiness and a free-wheeling posture to both hot and horrible sexuality, otherwise than that Adrian Garcia Bogliano's unwholesome-seed opus Here Comes The Devil doesn't result to much more than a stylish ode to 70's giallo-esque undue amount.
Staci Layne Wilson(StaciWilson.com): It's not at once terrifying, but Here Comes the Devil is subtly scary and well virtue a look.
David Nusair(Reel Film Reviews): An peculiarly tedious horror effort…

Sunday, April 20th, 2014 07:04 Comments Off

Great Expectations

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Reviews:
Colin Covert(Minneapolis Star Tribune): The intersecting central roles go wanting.
Annlee Ellingson(Los Angeles Times): It is skillfully made and adeptly performed; but also so it doesn't absolutely add anything to the canon.
Mary Houlihan(Chicago Sun-Times): This Great Expectations is each absorbing addition to the roster of Dickens films that continues our 21st-centenary fascination with the worlds created ~ the agency of a 19th-century storyteller.
Barbara VanDenburgh(Arizona Republic): Director Mike Newell approaches the sprawling bildungsroman through a stiff formalism, sacrificing all cinematic commotion for the sake of exalting cyclopean performances.
David Hiltbrand(Philadelphia Inquirer): Honors the spring while making some small but betokening alterations.
Stephen Whitty(Newark Star-Ledger): It's not sinless what this re-do adds do not include another line to these actors' resumes.
Philip Martin(Arkansas Democrat-Gazette): … has the have the consciousness of being of a very well done History Channel lengthening. Which doesn't make it unlucky, only superfluous.
John Beifuss(Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)): In a culture already awash with so much Dickens, a different take on 'Great Expectations' indispensably to be a real pip (pardon me) to be worth the disquietude.
Todd Jorgenson(Cinemalogue.com): It ~ or other feels more suited for the 'Masterpiece Theatre' concourse than for the multiplex.
Frank Swietek(One Guy’s Opinion): Its accuracy to the source and its in fashion, though somewhat sedate approach make it a well-disposed, if not great, modern alternative to Lean's mum-superb filmization.
Matt Prigge(Metro): The creation can always stand to be reminded, flat for the ten thousandth time, of towering art, even from those that contain a boring lead who seems to set out through a trendy haircut every falter.
Chris Hewitt (St. Paul)(St. Paul Pioneer Press): It's a large visualization, but it's no substitute for the book.
Duane Dudek(Milwaukee Journal Sentinel): A BBC- or PBS-caliber television movie that, as long as atmospheric, does not have a vogue of production values beyond Ralph Fiennes and Helena Bonham Carter, giving clamorous performances in pivotal roles.
Ken Hanke(Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)): Helena Bonham Carter's Miss Havisham is considerably the most fascinating incarnation of this nature I've ever seen, and she's matched every step of the way by Ralph Fiennes in the same proportion that Abel Magwitch.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-beam.com): Missing the connective tissue that's served preceding adaptations so well. Without dramatic lustiness, Newell has created a museum scrap, best presented on mute.
Marc Mohan(Oregonian): The latest pellicle version of Dickens' novel offers no degree new except a chance to look another generation of talented hams weapons its memorable characters.
Prairie Miller(NewsBlaze): The never-ending classic could not be more proper in its ironic title alone, to this verge of life of economic crisis in capitalism and the trauma of in a descending course class mobility. And with class dubiousness unleashed back then in both bearish and comical storytelling.
Kenneth R. Morefield(Christianity Today): But Newell's rendering stands out: its emotional core is not in the same manner much in the romance between Pip and Estella for the re~on that in Pip's moral expanding and how the love story informs and complicates it.
Steven Boone(RogerEbert.com): As the pages grow dizzy faster, focusing on the hows and whys of a greater crime central to the plot, this concision and fleetness make the film feel like a late thriller. Booo.

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04 Comments Off

No God, No Master

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Reviews:
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): A thin skin that probably should have been called "No Ambien? No Problem!"
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): A order of issue-driven snapshots instead of affair genuinely illuminating.
Joe Neumaier(New York Daily News): Interesting science of government done in by so-so filmmaking.
Danny King(Village Voice): Green is both a capable filmmaker and a unclouded history buff.
Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): Although marred ~ the agency of a weak script and an forward film score, this film is saved ~ means of its theme, namely the Palmer Raids of 1919 that was a forerunner to the abuse of democratic rights happening equitable now.
Chris Klimek(The Dissolve): [No God, No Master is] aspiring in a way that more high-priced films are rarely allowed to subsist anymore, illuminating a fascinating, underexplored series of American history [...]
Prairie Miller(WBAI Radio): With this suppressed US story of rebellion, anarchism, the Palmer raids and the IWW resurrected at the movies, this bound by duty thriller gets points for just existing. Even whether or not somewhat a reticent victim itself of the conduct intimidation it indicts here.
Sara Maria Vizcarrondo(Movies With Butter): Strathairn delivers not only so canned lines like they're recent from the vine, and Ray Wise, during the time that one of two characters without one accent, is again brilliant at existence the most duplicitous man you have power to't beat with common import or a stick.

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Friday, April 11th, 2014 07:04 Comments Off

Detonator

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Reviews:
Inkoo Kang(Los Angeles Times): A repetitive, sluggishly paced nocturnal rumination on why we bother reuniting by old friends we purposefully left backward.
Dennis Harvey(Variety): Damon Maulucci and Keir Politz put in order a fine feature debut with this little, punchy drama.
Ernest Hardy(Village Voice): The script is weighty, but the film's greatest estate are Levine's visage and act.
John Beifuss(Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)): Sort of a inferior-key, naturalistic variant on themes explored in Edgar Wright's 'The World's End,' since a suburban male 'soccer mom' is pulled back into a demimonde of drab rock music and sexual possibility by the surprise return of his 'toxic' antique bandmate.

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Current time is: 24 Apr 2014 03:42